Converting KVM virtual machines to VirtualBox

Recently the requirement came up to take a KVM based virtual machine and
move it over to a VirtualBox image. Which turned out to be a fairly simple
endeavour, and was fairly painless. The longest part was transferring over the
40 GB image from one machine to the other where the conversion could take
place. The machine the image was coming from was only on a 100 Mbit/sec
connection so that took a good hour.

Converting from KVM to VirtualBox for a FreeBSD image was pretty
simple, the VBoxManage command has a convertdd command that allows you to
convert from raw disk .img format to .vdi format.

VBoxManage convertdd KVM-image.img VB-image.vdi

After this, unfortunately, there is no way to to automatically convert over the
settings that the virtual machine had, such as the network cards, the memory
allocations and hard drive settings. You will have to go to VirtualBox and
create a new virtual machine and replicate all of the settings. Once that is
done make sure to select the same type of disk controller (SATA or IDE) so that
the drive will hopefully be assigned the same name in the device tree so that
you don’t need to alter your /etc/fstab.

Hopefully everything boots without any issues. If not try creating a new
virtual machine, attach the converted image as a secondary drive and see if you
can mount the converted image within your new install. If so maybe transferring
the data using rsync or dump/restore would be an option.

Converting KVM virtual machines to VirtualBox

Recently the requirement came up to take a KVM based virtual machine and
move it over to a VirtualBox image. Which turned out to be a fairly simple
endeavour, and was fairly painless. The longest part was transferring over the
40 GB image from one machine to the other where the conversion could take
place. The machine the image was coming from was only on a 100 Mbit/sec
connection so that took a good hour.

Converting from KVM to VirtualBox for a FreeBSD image was pretty
simple, the VBoxManage command has a convertdd command that allows you to
convert from raw disk .img format to .vdi format.

VBoxManage convertdd KVM-image.img VB-image.vdi

After this, unfortunately, there is no way to to automatically convert over the
settings that the virtual machine had, such as the network cards, the memory
allocations and hard drive settings. You will have to go to VirtualBox and
create a new virtual machine and replicate all of the settings. Once that is
done make sure to select the same type of disk controller (SATA or IDE) so that
the drive will hopefully be assigned the same name in the device tree so that
you don’t need to alter your /etc/fstab.

Hopefully everything boots without any issues. If not try creating a new
virtual machine, attach the converted image as a secondary drive and see if you
can mount the converted image within your new install. If so maybe transferring
the data using rsync or dump/restore would be an option.

Converting KVM virtual machines to VirtualBox

Recently the requirement came up to take a KVM based virtual machine and
move it over to a VirtualBox image. Which turned out to be a fairly simple
endeavour, and was fairly painless. The longest part was transferring over the
40 GB image from one machine to the other where the conversion could take
place. The machine the image was coming from was only on a 100 Mbit/sec
connection so that took a good hour.

Converting from KVM to VirtualBox for a FreeBSD image was pretty
simple, the VBoxManage command has a convertdd command that allows you to
convert from raw disk .img format to .vdi format.

VBoxManage convertdd KVM-image.img VB-image.vdi

After this, unfortunately, there is no way to to automatically convert over the
settings that the virtual machine had, such as the network cards, the memory
allocations and hard drive settings. You will have to go to VirtualBox and
create a new virtual machine and replicate all of the settings. Once that is
done make sure to select the same type of disk controller (SATA or IDE) so that
the drive will hopefully be assigned the same name in the device tree so that
you don’t need to alter your /etc/fstab.

Hopefully everything boots without any issues. If not try creating a new
virtual machine, attach the converted image as a secondary drive and see if you
can mount the converted image within your new install. If so maybe transferring
the data using rsync or dump/restore would be an option.

Converting KVM virtual machines to VirtualBox

Recently the requirement came up to take a KVM based virtual machine and
move it over to a VirtualBox image. Which turned out to be a fairly simple
endeavour, and was fairly painless. The longest part was transferring over the
40 GB image from one machine to the other where the conversion could take
place. The machine the image was coming from was only on a 100 Mbit/sec
connection so that took a good hour.

Converting from KVM to VirtualBox for a FreeBSD image was pretty
simple, the VBoxManage command has a convertdd command that allows you to
convert from raw disk .img format to .vdi format.

VBoxManage convertdd KVM-image.img VB-image.vdi

After this, unfortunately, there is no way to to automatically convert over the
settings that the virtual machine had, such as the network cards, the memory
allocations and hard drive settings. You will have to go to VirtualBox and
create a new virtual machine and replicate all of the settings. Once that is
done make sure to select the same type of disk controller (SATA or IDE) so that
the drive will hopefully be assigned the same name in the device tree so that
you don’t need to alter your /etc/fstab.

Hopefully everything boots without any issues. If not try creating a new
virtual machine, attach the converted image as a secondary drive and see if you
can mount the converted image within your new install. If so maybe transferring
the data using rsync or dump/restore would be an option.

My Saturday Thus Far

Okay, I’m not moving QUITE as quickly as I’d like today, but I’ve still gotten some things done, even if they’re bizarre and silly, like my strange organizational tangents:

Lanyard Loop
A collection of lanyards that started as a snarled ball in a bag.
Legs and Batteries

Yep, legs and batteries. At least they're labeled.

I got a wee bit hungry:

Cereal

Sure, it's cereal for children, dry, but hey, titanium spork!

And finally, I found this, in a bag that had been to Defcon with me, along with those lanyards:

Pedobear Ping Pong Ball

Hey! Who the hell drew Pedobear in sharpie on my ping-pong ball?

I’m lookin’ at you, Spux….

100% Pure Filler!

Okay, after a bit of a long and painful day, I haven’t got much to say here….

I did want to do a bit of a tease, though, about some thoughts rolling around in the back of my head that you can look forward to in days to come:

  • Why I’m back at it!
  • Some thoughts on DJ’ing that have occurred to me
  • Hackerspaces, Locksport, and other various subjects that are confusing to the general public, and possibly even sound dangerous, but are still important to me, and why I think they should be important to you
  • More art, and DIY thoughts, undoubtedly
  • A wildly belated “2011 Wrapup”
  • My thoughts on whether “Instagram” and other methods for making digital photographs look “vintage” are cheating, probably combined with pimping places you can actually buy some of my photographs, causing me, personally, some minor profit
  • One hopes, new pens
  • More silly songs
  • And, undoubtedly, more pictures of my cat because, as far as I can tell, cats are pretty popular on the Internet.

Here’s one to tide you over: