Using Paper Protos to Check EAGLE Footprints

Checking Paper FootprintChecking footprints in a PCB layout review with only the on-screen file can be a pain in the neck.  There are many different measurements that need to be made for each individual part, and the mouse-based measurement tool can be somewhat obnoxious to get exactly on the edge of a pad.

There is a much faster way assuming one has all of the parts on hand: print out a to-scale paper prototype and place all of the components on the board.  It is fast to setup, and visually inspecting each component takes about 30 seconds.  There are, however a few tricks to be sure the printout is to scale.  I wrote an article on Element14 with step-by-step instructions.

Read the Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!

Arduino Clones Can Be Better Than Shields

 

Evil Mad Science's 'Diavolino' Clone

Evil Mad Science’s ‘Diavolino’ Clone

Arduino is certainly the most popular method of getting info electronics, or at least embedded electronics.  My BlueStamp Engineering students seem to gravitate to them when selecting their projects.  But what about after the first few projects have been created with the Arduino?  What if the designer wants to add a relay, or another LED to the board?  Most people create a shield which allows them to plug in, but for simple projects I believe there is a better way: creating their own Arduino clone (AKA Derivative).  This is where the designer modifies the public Arduino EAGLE PCB files to add their extra parts, and then makes their own board! It can save cost, space, and connectors!  I go into more detail on my latest Element14 post:

Derivatives enjoy some significant design benefits over a shield.  First, a single board is less than half the size and more robust than stacking an additional PCB on top of the purchased Arduino via headers.  Second, it will be a cheaper solution than buying a stock Arduino and the custom shield PCB/parts.  Finally, there is a lot to learn from starting with an existing PCB design and tweaking it.  Not to mention the pride one would get from creating their own stand-alone design, even if it is attained by standing on the shoulders of giants.

Read The Full Article Here!