Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.

Hello world!

Welcome to my new blog.

I go by the handle Toast.  I am an IT/AV nerd, and I like to play with technology.  I enjoy spelunking n*x systems and pretty much anything else with a command line interface, hence the title of this blog.  I also enjoy playing with the guts of electronic gadgets, anything Arduino or RasPi related, programming (especially in Python), and a relatively obscure dying sport called aggressive inline skating.  

I am a big fan of the idea of hacker spaces in general, and I’m a proud member of the Denver hacker space DenHac in particular.  At DenHac I’m able to explore the limits of what is possible with technology in a spirit of playful cleverness.  This is the definition of the word “hacking” as according to Richard Stallman.

Reading through my InfoSec class textbook “Principles of Information Security” by Michael Whitman, I came across this definition: “Hackers are ‘people who use and create computer software to gain access to information illegally.’” While this definition and Stallman’s are not necessarily mutually exclusive, the former (and unfortunately more common) definition explicitly excludes any form of legal activity, which seems absurd to me when you consider the fact that the culture and history behind the word “hacker” predates most “anti-hacking” laws by decades.

Anyway, this is all a round-about way of saying that yes: I do consider myself a bit of a hacker, and no: I am not a computer-criminal, techno-vandal, identity-thief, or cyber-terrorist.  From this point forward, any mention of “hacking” or “hackers” on this blog can be assumed to follow the Stallman definition, unless otherwise noted.

So thank you for visiting my blog.  I love sharing information and teaching people what I know, so I will be posting again soon about recent hacking adventures and other interests of mine.